Saturday, May 31, 2014

Buzzfeed: How to Get Back to Narnia

I write as someone who was left behind, as anyone who has read and loved a magical book is, marooned in the world we tried so hard to escape. We are Narnians bereft of Narnia, witches without wands, children who have grown old. I do not mourn for my lost childhood: let me be clear. Adulthood is another, maybe equally profound, form of escape, and one I relish. Still, I’ve been thinking about this very particular form of reading—desperate, wishful, life-sustaining—that I for a long time had put aside.

Read the rest: Buzzfeed

1 comment:

Tamayn Irraniah said...

I think some part of us, regardless of age, yearns for a level of escape. Especially when the economy is like this, the need for an escape route becomes more and more necessary.

I remember my sister reading them and us playing like we were the characters when we were kids. I was Edmund, simply because I was the second youngest boy. It's not that I didn't see some part of myself in Edmund, as I've always been fairly skeptical of things, but it always annoyed me that I could never be Peter, based on age. Mysteriously though, my oldest sister who read the books, could be Lucy, while my other sister who was second oldest in the family, was Susan. Go figure that one. I read them myself, and although I liked the series, my favorite of the books was always The Horse and His Boy, which is at it's heart an escape fantasy within an escape fantasy. If you've never read them, I also highly recommend The Prydain Chronicles, which are actually somewhat based on Welsh myth. With that series it's much harder to pick a favorite, but Taran Wanderer is quite well done. It has something for everyone.

I never really knew about the religious connotations myself until I was older, in high school, but that never stopped me really. The author has his intentions, but when a book like the Chronicles of Narnia exists, we always have options for pulling out the ideas we want. Lewis was a contemporary of Tolkien, as they were both at Oxford together, Medievalists both. After my program of study, it became much more evident that it was the case, of how much religion was in the series.

In any case, I was more than happy to read them, and they were a great distraction when I was young. They will hold a place in my life, but never to the same extreme as the aforementioned Prydain Chronicles.