Tuesday, April 14, 2015

And the spoiler shall come upon every city...

Via Slate's You're not afraid of spoilers; you're afraid of the future

Game of Thrones presents a particularly striking example of the complicated interplay between time and spoilers. Because the television series has hewn unusually closely to the books on which it’s based (though that may be changing), those who’ve read its source material come to each episode with a great deal of knowledge about what to expect. This threatens to layer spoilers on top of spoilers in discussions of the show, as readers gleefully anticipate events that mere viewers could never predict. Before long, that situation will be reversed, as the show will surpass the plot of the novels. Because the show’s creators claim they’ll be working from George R.R. Martin’s plot outlines, this means those who prefer the books may have the subsequent volumes spoiled years before they have the opportunity to read them. Their less well-read siblings, however, will be safer than ever before, finally watching the story as it unfolds.

2 comments:

Arion said...

Turns out I started watching Game of Thrones without having read the book, so I haven't had any problem with spoilers. My father, however, has read all the books and he's constantly comparing them with HBO's show.

Writer said...

Arion, I've read three of the books during the course of the show. And I like the added perspective it's given me, but I don't think it's actually spoiled anything. And I tend to like when the show goes on its own. I like the mental gymnastics of "oh, well, this is what happened in the book. See how this changes everything?"