LexGo: Is Lexington the Literary Capital of Mid-America?



Via LexGo:

Many states have rich literary traditions. But few can top what writers who were born in or moved to Kentucky have produced — and are producing.

Robert Penn Warren was the nation's first poet laureate, as well as the first writer to win Pulitzer Prizes in more than one literary genre. William Wells Brown was the first published black novelist. Hunter S. Thompson helped create a new genre of first-person narrative, "gonzo journalism."

Wendell Berry, whose environmental writing has attracted an international following, was selected last week to give the 2012 Jefferson Lecture on April 23 at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. It is the federal government's most prestigious honor for intellectual achievement in the humanities.

Eastern Kentucky's mountains have produced, nurtured and inspired many outstanding writers, including James Still, Jesse Stuart, Harriette Simpson Arnow, Harry M. Caudill, Gurney Norman, Janice Holt Giles, Verna Mae Slone, Elizabeth Madox Roberts and Silas House. Western Kentucky's great voices have included Mason and Irvin S. Cobb.

Central Kentuckians James Lane Allen and John Fox Jr. were national best-sellers a century ago, just as Kim Edwards, Sue Grafton and Barbara Kingsolver are today.

Elizabeth Hardwick and Cleanth Brooks were two of the 20th century's most influential literary critics. Other notable Kentucky writers from the recent past include Thomas Merton, Allen Tate, Gayle Jones and Guy Davenport.

Among today's heavy hitters: Sena Jeter Naslund, Frank X Walker, Maurice Manning, Richard Taylor, Chris Offutt, C.E. Morgan, Crystal Wilkinson, Jane Gentry Vance and Erik Reece.

Despite a deep streak of anti-intellectualism, Kentucky has always nurtured great writing. But why? Some say it is the state's location. Kentucky was the first Western frontier, a Civil War border state and a place always in the midst of transition, migration, clashing values and regional tensions.

"Conflict makes for great stories," Chethik noted.

"I think it's because we like to talk so much and tell stories on one another," McClanahan said. "It's so much a part of life. Maybe it's in the water."

It is not the water, but the land, said Finney, a South Carolina native who has lived in Kentucky for two decades. "Our greatness as writers has to do with the land. Our connection to it," she said. "We don't really own the land. The land owns us."

More than anything, Finney said, it is Kentucky's mountains: "We never credit the mountains enough for helping shape who we are, for giving us a specific lens through which to see the world, a lens to nurture what we have to say about our human presence in it."

Writing is a solitary endeavor. But writers need a supportive community, and Kentucky has it. You see it in the attendance at huge annual book fairs in Frankfort and Bowling Green, at bookstores across the state and at events such as the monthly Holler Poets reading, which packs Al's Bar on North Limestone Street.

You also see it in the attendance at classes and events at the non-profit Carnegie Center, housed in a beautiful old building in Gratz Park that used to be the Lexington Public Library.

"This is a sacred space; a nurturing space for writers," said Finney, who wrote much of her book, Rice, in one of the center's study carrels.

The article also mentions Nikky Finney's National Book Award acceptance speech - the video to which has gone viral...



Someday, my name will be added to the list of Kentucky writers. :)

Comments

Will said…
William Wells Brown achieved more as a writer than is told in the above. This is from the Wikipedia entry on him:

"Most scholars agree that Brown is the first published African-American playwright. Brown wrote two plays, Experience; or, How to Give a Northern Man a Backbone (1856, unpublished and no longer extant) and The Escape; or, A Leap for Freedom (1858). He read the latter aloud at abolitionist meetings in lieu of the typical lecture."

The Escape was not played on a stage during Brown's life of for decades thereafter. I had the great pleasure of designing it in what every source we could find indicated it would be its premiere production in the early 1970s in Boston. Clearly based on Shakespeare and on melodramas Brown had seen in the US and in Europe, it is perhaps naive but also a moving look at slavery from someone who knew it from inside the horror.
Writer said…
Wow, Will. Thank you. To bad is first play no longer exists. It'd be neat to find it. :)
becca said…
wow i learned a lot today from this post thank you
Writer said…
You're welcome, becca. :)

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